The Woodstove, the Attic Fan and the Girl Up Yonder

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Art Compere

List Price: $14.95
5.5" x 8.5" (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on White paper
280 pages
ISBN-13: 978-1976013515 
ISBN-10: 1976013518
BISAC: Fiction / Christian / General


Arinder and Darleen Haguewood were brought up in wealth. As children, they got everything they wanted. They met and married and had two children of their own: Lurlean and Warnock. They built an elaborate five-bedroom house where each bedroom has a bath and shower, a walk-in closet, a TV with a DVD player, and plenty of room for game tables and everything a growing child would want or need. Then they decided they didn’t want their children to grow up the way they did. They swapped houses with Woodie Ferguson, a single man who lived in a shack down the hill from them. They lived in the shack where Lurlean and Warnock had daily chores needed for survival. After Woodie got settled in the house up yonder, he married Kellie, a woman he met on the Internet. Kellie not only had a daughter and son the ages of Lurlean and Warnock, but she was a devout atheist who vowed that nothing religious would be permitted at the school her children, Kindal and Keith, attended. Woodie never told Kellie that the family in the shack by the small stream down the hill from them actually owned the elaborate house and the thousand-acre cotton plantation that went with the house.

Lurlean got so wrapped up in splitting stove wood for their stove and milking one or both of their Jersey cows and working with a new boy at school on a way to get the Ten Commandments and Bible verses posted at school, that when she accidently found out the house up yonder was actually hers, she preferred to leave things the way they were. She knew that Kindal’s mother was there only because of the house and plantation, and if she found out the truth, she would leave and take Kindal with her. Therefore, Lurlean let Hebrews 13:5 run its course in her life; she never told Kindal or her mother the truth about her house and theirs.